David Tennant - The Royal Tennant Company Index du Forum
David Tennant - The Royal Tennant Company
Le premier et unique forum francophone dédié à David Tennant
 
David Tennant - The Royal Tennant Company Index du ForumFAQRechercherS’enregistrerConnexion



:: Art Desk : Much Ado About nothing (avec traduction) ::

 
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    David Tennant - The Royal Tennant Company Index du Forum -> David, sa vie, ses oeuvres... -> Articles de presse -> 2011
Sujet précédent :: Sujet suivant  
Auteur Message
isaf
Tennant Encyclopedia

Hors ligne

Inscrit le: 24 Mar 2009
Messages: 1 261
Localisation: Lausanne

MessagePosté le: Dim 13 Jan 2013 - 12:49    Sujet du message: Art Desk : Much Ado About nothing (avec traduction) Répondre en citant

Art Desk : Much Ado about nothing



Source




If a great whorl of bubblegum were plonked on Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth all summer long, would there be any point in complaining about it? How do you criticise the uncriticisable? A new Much Ado About Nothing at Wyndham's is Shakespeare-by-television: failsafe. As theartsdesk has recently pointed out, there is the "other production" at the Globe, which celeb chatter over and vast publicity for this brassy West End one have conspired to relegate to a sideshow somewhere obscure south of the Thames. Chances are, the latter's more like a Much Ado people will want to see and be moved by than Charing Cross Road's monster sell-out would ever try to be. TV, anyone?

If a great whorl of bubblegum were plonked on Trafalgar Square's fourth plinth all summer long, would there be any point in complaining about it? How do you criticise the uncriticisable? A new Much Ado About Nothing at Wyndham's is Shakespeare-by-television: failsafe. As theartsdesk has recently pointed out, there is the "other production" at the Globe, which celeb chatter over and vast publicity for this brassy West End one have conspired to relegate to a sideshow somewhere obscure south of the Thames. Chances are, the latter's more like a Much Ado people will want to see and be moved by than Charing Cross Road's monster sell-out would ever try to be. TV, anyone?

If you've neither watched Doctor Who in the last decade nor enjoyed The Catherine Tate Show in the same period, what you'll see at Wyndham's is a predictably loud, shake-'em-on-down version of Shakespeare's most barbed mature comedy (written, probably, in 1598, preceding by a year or two Twelfth Night and As You Like It), with some good ideas and wretched vulgarities, and you might think: hm, good Benedick, cute, whippet-thin and who exactly is he? And how did that curvaceous redhead get the part of Beatrice?

SupermanReservations here don't matter. I have it on good authority that David Tennant (pictured) and Catherine Tate have each invested, financially, in the production, the return on which must convince them they've got the play right, though director Josie Rourke must take credit for a slick, attractive staging on this most cramped of prosceniums. Revolve; pillars; fake marble flooring; shuttered windows at the back. Its tidy economy of scale is one of its principal virtues.

It's set in Spain, on the Costa del Sol - maybe Gibraltar - where the men, when not in starched white naval livery, schmooze around in beach shorts and the women seem dressed for a perpetual disco. We're in the 1980s. The dancing's awful and, in the first half, a wantonly superficial sense of style removes the languor and sultriness from this Much Ado, which, in the text, takes place in Messina, Sicily; though it tries, this does little to enhance the play's witty, contemporary appeal (something Bill Alexander so famously found in 1986 by overlaying an RSC The Merry Wives of Windsor with the 1950s).

If we ignore the stars for a moment, the acting across the board is fine. Adam James's Don Pedro, the good brother who woos his host Leonato's daughter Hero on his friend Claudio's behalf, is light and winning. Elliot Levey's bad brother, the malcontent Don John, who spoils the fun by helping trick Claudio into believing Hero is unfaithful just before they get married, is excellent as a sharp-voiced spiv. Sarah MacRae does well with charm and poise in the minimally speaking role of Hero, while special commendation must go to Tom Bateman, fresh from LAMDA (and looking uncannily like a younger Roger Federer), as Claudio: his diction is superb, his charisma easy, and he is properly on song - fiery but controlled - in the important scene when he falsely denounces Hero at the altar.

No stranger to Shakespeare, then, David Tennant as Benedick fills the part and stage with a rare, seasoned confidence and is never less than watchable. He turns, Cupid-like, almost every line of his soliloquies into a "paper bullet" (Benedick's phrase) to melt the audience - could he ever fail to? - and Rourke has come up with some spectacularly inventive business with white paint in Act II, scene 3 when the reluctant lover overhears reports of Beatrice's "love" for him. Tennant is a naturally funny actor, nicely complemented in the comic subplot by John Ramm's over-the-top, gun-toting soldier-idiot Dogberry. Rourke has pitched the sometimes tedious nightwatch scenes very well.

But she can't do much about Catherine Tate as Beatrice. I'm a fan of her TV show, though I know she divides opinion - but it was Tate I was most looking forward to. Beatrice should, or can, be skittish, flirtatious and unpredictable. Tate is matter-of-fact, hard-nosed and static. She has one basic gesture, and that's finger-pointing. Her accent slews all over the place, from courtly posh to estuary - familiar, of course, from her screen comedy - and throughout it's as if she's just one step or chortle or guffaw away from the parody and mockery, the self-mockery, that make her TV characters so compelling. Here, she just doesn't trust the part, or get its sexiness, or truly play, as she should, with the admirably playful Tennant, though to do her justice, ironically she grows into it when she has to become serious over Benedick "killing" Claudio.

Tate isn't helped by one of the worst ideas of the evening when, in her overhearing scene (Hero and Ursula chat about Benedick's eye for her), she flies up and down on a pulley, and flails mid-air, a house painter on the other end. This unfunny pantomime device should be scrapped immediately. Other straying from the text - Barachio visibly screwing his girlfriend and calling her "Hero" for Claudio's benefit, Claudio drinking himself into a ghost-seeing stupor on the night before he has to marry Hero's "replacement" - can be forgiven. Rourke knows what her West End audience needs to be helped with. It's just not always a lovely sight.



Citation:

Si une grande mâchée de gomme était collée toute l’été sur le quatrième banc de Trafalgar Square, est-ce qu’il y aurait une raison de s’en plaindre? Comment peut-on critiquer l’incritiquable? Une nouvelle mouture de Beaucoup de bruit pour rien au Théâtre Wyndham est comme du Shakespeare à la télé: une valeur sûre. Comme The Art Desk l’a fait remarquer, il y a cette "autre production" au Globe, que les bavardages et une vaste publicité pour la production tapageuse du West End ont relégués à un obscure spectacle de seconde zone du sud de la Tamise. Il y a de fortes chances qu'au final, d'avantage de gens préféreront voir et être émus par le plus gros monstre vendeur de billets jamais vu sur Charing Cross Road. Un peu de télé, quelqu’un?

Si vous n’avez vu ni Doctor Who dans la dernière décennie ni The Catherine Tate Show durant la même période, ce que vous verrez au Théâtre Wyndham est très prévisible: une version bruyante et agitée de la comédie de Shakespeare la plus mature (écrite probablement en 1598, précédent d’un an ou deux La Nuit des rois et Comme il vous plaira), et avec certaines bonnes idées et de pauvres vulgarités, et vous pourriez penser: hum… bon Bénédick, mignon et élancé et qui est-il au juste? Et comment cette rouquine toute en courbes a obtenu la partie de Béatrice?

Ici, les réservations ne sont pas importantes. De source sûre, David Tennant et Catherine Tate ont chacun investi, financièrement, dans la production, le retour devant les convaincre qu’ils avaient la bonne pièce, quoique on doit donner crédit au metteur en scène Josie Rourke pour une mise en scène impressionnante et attachante sur la plus petite des scènes. Mouvements, piliers, faux planchers de marbre, vitres closes à l’arrière. Son économie d’espace est l’une de ses principales virtues.

L’action se situe en Espagne, sur la Costa Del Sol - peut-être Gibraltar - où les hommes, quand ils ne sont pas dans l’uniforme empesé, traînent partout en short de plage et où les femmes semblent vêtues pour une disco permanente. Nous sommes dans les années 80. La danse est horrible et, pendant la première moitié de la pièce, un sens gratuit et superficiel du style enlève toute langueur et désir de Beaucoup de bruit, qui, dans le texte, prend place à Messina, en Sicile. A travers cet essai, cela améliore un peu l’humour et l'aspect contemporain de la pièce (quelque chose pour laquelle Bill Alexander s'est fait connaitre en 1986 en plaçant The Merry Wives of Windsor dans les années 50).

Si nous ignorons les vedettes un moment, le jeu d’acteur est bien. Le Don Pedro d’Adam James, le bon frère qui séduit Hero, la fille de son hôte Leonato, pour son ami Claudio, est rafraichissant et gagnant. Le méchant frère d’Elliot Levey, le mécontent Don John, qui gâche la fête en aidant à piéger Claudio dans la croyance qu’Hero est infidèle juste avant le mariage, atteint son but aussi bien qu’un menteur professionnel. Sarah MacRae réussit bien, toute en charme et en douceur, dans le rôle peu parlant de Hero, pendant qu’une mention spéciale est accordée à Tom Bateman, tout frais sorti de l’Académie navale (et ressemblant décidément à un jeune Roger Federer) en tant que Claudio: sa diction est superbe, son charisme naturel et il est dans le ton - féroce mais contrôlé - dans l’importante scène où il dénonce faussement Hero devant l’autel.

Aucunement étranger à Shakespeare, il y a également, David Tennant dans le rôle de Bénédick qu'il joue avec une confiance chevronnée et n’est jamais moins que regardable. Il tourne, à l’instar de Cupidon, pratiquement chaque réplique de ses monologues comme un "boulet de papier" (réplique de Bénédick) pour faire fondre l’audience - comment pourrait-il jamais échouer? - et Josie Rourke a proposé quelques tactiques spectaculairement inventives avec de la peinture blanche dans l’Acte II, Scène 3, quand l’amoureux réticent surprend une discussion sur "l’amour" que Beatrice lui porte. Tennant est acteur naturellement comique, bien complété dans l’intrigue secondaire comique par le soldat beta déglingué et armé de John Ramm, Dogberry. Rourke a très bien rendu les scènes de la patrouille, qui sont parfois un peu pénibles à faire.

Mais elle n’a pas pu faire grand chose à propos de la Béatrice de Catherine Tate. Je suis un admirateur de son émission télé, quoique je sache que l’opinion est divisée à son propos, mais c’est pour elle que j’avais les plus grandes attentes. Béatrice devrait être, ou peut être, malicieuse, séductrice et imprévisible. Tate est terre à terre, a du pif et est statique. Elle a un geste de base - et c’est le doigt pointé - Son accent change constamment: de snob courtois à estuarien, familier bien sûr et tiré de sa comédie télévisée - et tout au long de la pièce comme si elle n’était qu’à un pas du braiment (gloussement de rire) ou d’en faire une réelle parodie ou une moquerie, ce genre d’autodérision qui rend son personnage de la télé si contraignant. Ici, elle ne fait pas confiance au texte, ne parvient pas à offrir une image sensuelle, ou à réellement jouer, comme elle le devrait, avec un Tennant admirablement espiègle. Mais pour lui rendre justice, elle approfondit le personnage, ironiquement, quand elle doit être sérieuse avec Bénédick à propos "de tuer" Claudio.

Tate n’est pas aidée par l’une des plus mauvaises idées de la soirée quand, dans la scène où elle surprend une conversation (Hero et Ursula qui bavardent de l’intérêt de Benedick pour elle), elle vole de haut en bas sur une poulie, et fait des mouvements de nageur entre ciel et terre, pendant qu’un ouvrier peintre tient l’autre bout de la corde. Ce dispositif pas du tout amusant de pantomime devrait être retiré immédiatement. Autre point faible du texte, Barachio qui "s’occupe" visiblement de sa petite amie et l’appelle Hero pour le bénéfice de Claudio, et Claudio qui s’enivre jusqu’à la stupeur hallucinogène la nuit précédent son mariage, peut être pardonné. Rourke sait ce que l’audience du West End attend. Et ce n’est pas toujours une jolie vue.



Traduction par Idontwanttogo_01
Relecture par Isaf
© Art Desk 2011,toute reproduction, partielle ou complète, est interdite sans autorisation des Webmasters

_________________


Un grand grand MERCI à Duam78!!!!
Revenir en haut
Publicité






MessagePosté le: Dim 13 Jan 2013 - 12:49    Sujet du message: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Revenir en haut
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Poster un nouveau sujet   Répondre au sujet    David Tennant - The Royal Tennant Company Index du Forum -> David, sa vie, ses oeuvres... -> Articles de presse -> 2011 Toutes les heures sont au format GMT + 1 Heure
Page 1 sur 1

 
Sauter vers:  



Index | Panneau d’administration | Creer un forum | Forum gratuit d’entraide | Annuaire des forums gratuits | Signaler une violation | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Flowers of Evil © theme by larme d'ange 2006
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Traduction par : phpBB-fr.com